Category: Black, Race + American

“We have to visit plantations… To keep them honest. Black folks in particular have to stop being scared. ‘I can’t be there’ but your grandaddy could? You can take it for 3 min’. Follow me for an instant into the tobacco field. Own it.”

“We have to visit plantations… To keep them honest. Black folks in particular have to stop being scared. ‘I can’t be there’ but your grandaddy could? You can take it for 3 min’. Follow me for an instant into the tobacco field. Own it.”

Listening to @thecookinggene #MichaelTwitty @adrinkracas #gatewayartsdistrict

Listening to @thecookinggene #MichaelTwitty @adrinkracas #gatewayartsdistrict

Listening to @thecookinggene #MichaelTwitty @adrinkracas #gatewayartsdistrict

2 Likes, 1 Comments – Justin (@soulstrongblog) on Instagram: “Listening to @thecookinggene #MichaelTwitty @adrinkracas #gatewayartsdistrict”

Talks & Thoughts: The Long Arm of History – Monuments and Statues Do Matter | Reginald F. Lewis Museum

While I can’t go to this, you should.

Talks & Thoughts: The Long Arm of History – Monuments and Statues Do Matter

A new community-centric public forum offering barbershop-style open discourse on current events that have an impact on the African American community. A panel presentation and community discussion about the impact and meaning of the violence in Charlottesville; the rise of white supremacy and white nationalism; and what the removal of our four Confederate statues means for Baltimore. Dr. Karsonya (Kaye) Wise Whitehead will moderate a conversation between our three “talkers” and the community around this topic.

Topic: The Long Arm of History: Monuments and Statues Really Do Matter

Moderated By: Dr. Karsonya (Kaye) Wise Whitehead, Associate Professor of Communication and African and African American Studies in the Department of Communication at Loyola University Maryland

Date: Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 2pm

Admission: FREE

REGINALD F. LEWIS MUSEUM

Address 830 E. Pratt St.
Baltimore, MD 21202

bit.ly/2vMafxv

Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy

“The argument that the Confederate flag and other displays represent “heritage, not hate” ignores the near-universal heritage of African Americans whose ancestors were enslaved by the millions in the South. It trivializes their pain, their history and their concerns about racism — whether it’s the racism of the past or that of today.”

bit.ly/2w3DX3D