Category: Manners and Morals

No, Megyn Kelly Should Not Have Worn That Dress

“No, Megyn Kelly Should Not Have Worn That Dress”” on Inc. Magazine by Suzanne Lucas

“Now, does this mean that Kelly shouldn’t have challenged societal norms? It depends on what you think about this particular norm. Personally, I like the norm that spaghetti straps are an evening or beachwear choice. If Kelly wants to make it a news anchor norm, she can certainly work to do so, but she can’t do it without expecting some pushback. She can continue to wear spaghetti straps to work, encourage other female journalists to do the same, and eventually change the norm. If that’s what she wants, super-duper. If not, she should probably put on a sweater.”

http://on.inc.com/2aa3JVZ

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Miss Manners: Why do my dinner guests think it’s OK to be late?

I’m in wedding RSVP shenanigan-land, and I can use a drink.

GENTLE READER: Miss Manners is loath to question the hopes of Southern mothers, good cooks and hospitable hosts, and she lacks sympathy with tardy guests.

But you sound in need of a drink.

It doesn’t have to be alcohol, and you don’t even have to drink it yourself. But you could save yourself angst by providing the usual half-hour in which those who arrive on time are served drinks and small nibbles.

Now please stop tearing your hair out; it might get into your beautifully cooked food. Miss Manners is not absolving the latecomers; she is going to teach you to retrain them.

When you issue invitations for 6:30, you should add, “We will be sitting down to dinner promptly at 7.” Not only will this warn the stragglers, but it will relieve those who time their arrivals to avoid the endless cocktail hours to which other hosts have subjected them.

You will have timed your food accordingly and should serve it at the announced time. Guests who arrive later should be seated then, and told graciously, “I knew you would want us to go ahead.”

Lest you feel rude about doing this, Miss Manners assures you that there is distinguished precedent for this. That Southern gentleman George Washington insisted that official dinners over which he presided would be served at the announced time, explaining that delay would upset the cook. In your case, you know that to be true.

Miss Manners: Why do my dinner guests think it’s OK to be late?

Posted: 08/22/2014 11:45:34 AM PDT Updated: 08/24/2014 07:27:37 AM PDT DEAR MISS MANNERS: My mother was from the South, and accordingly she impressed upon me the fine art of entertaining guests in one’s home. I love to cook, and I truly prefer to cook dinner for friends over meeting at a restaurant.

The Power of Nice: How to Negotiate so Everyone Wins – Especially You!: ULI Washington Trends 2016

“The Power of Nice: How to Negotiate so Everyone Wins” by Ron Shapiro, at the Urban Land Institute

The Power of Nice: How to Negotiate so Everyone Wins – Especially You!: ULI Washington Trends 2016 from ULI Washington on Vimeo.

The Power of Nice: How to Negotiate so Everyone Wins – Especially You!: ULI Washington Trends 2016

Drawing on his unparalleled experiences from the worlds of law, sports, business, and community leadership, as well as in dealing with issues common to us all, Shapiro will touch on how to get what you want while building stronger relationships.

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David Steindl-Rast — Anatomy of Gratitude | On Being

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DAVID STEINDL-RAST —On Being:
Anatomy of Gratitude

My favorite quotes from the interview following its introduction description:

Now nearing 90, Brother David Steindl-Rast has lived through a world war, the end of an empire, and the fascist takeover of his country. He’s given a TED talk, viewed over five million times, on the subject of gratitude — a practice increasingly interrogated by scientists and physicians as a key to human well-being. He was also an early pioneer, together with Thomas Merton, of dialogue between Christian and Buddhist monastics. In this conversation from our visit to the Gut Aich Priory monastery in St. Gilgen, Austria, he speaks of mysticism as the birthright of every human being, and of the anatomy and practice of gratitude as full-blooded, reality-based, and redeeming.

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