Category: Development + Urbanism

Three Ways Mobile Transit Payments Will Change How We Move in Cities | Planetizen: The Urban Planning, Design, and Development Network

From Three Ways Mobile Transit Payments Will Change How We Move in Cities | Planetizen: The Urban Planning, Design, and Development Network by Regina Clewlow

Mobile payments are the next logical step for transit agencies—the ability to book, pay, and obtain real-time information about transit services will attract a new generation of users – improving the transit experience, reducing emissions, and changing the way we move in cities.

Millennials turned cities ‘hipster.’ Can they do the same for the suburbs? – The Washington Post

From: Millennials turned cities ‘hipster.’ Can they do the same for the suburbs? – The Washington Post
By Jordan Fraade

None of this was supposed to happen. For years, the running assumption among urban enthusiasts has been that we’re entering a new “Age of the City,” driven by people who look a lot like the residents of Hastings: young, well-educated, employed in the arts, nonprofits or creative industries, not necessarily poor but not rich either. One urban planner quipped that in some cities, what we call “gentrification” should really be called “youthification.” Cities and businesses sometimes go to self-parodic lengths.

Despite all that ink spilled about repurposed lofts and bike lanes, it’s quite likely that if you’re scraping by as a graphic designer, writer or even nonprofit employee in a big city, you’re going to end up in the ‘burbs after all. What does that mean for our suburbs? Will millennials remake them in their image? Is America destined to become a country of “Hipsturbia?”

Most modern suburbs were built through a combination of racial segregation, subsidized mortgages, forced low-density zoning and auto-dependent design. That’s still the way many suburbanites like it, and even the much-vaunted Creative Class may not be creative enough to redesign places that were built to exclude their kind.

 

9 things people always say at zoning hearings, illustrated by cats | Austin On Your Feet

6. “What this neighborhood really needs is a coffee shop, not more apartments.”

For all the mean things people sometimes say about developers, a lot of folks seem to fashion themselves amateur land developers, with a keen eye on exactly what types of businesses will succeed or fail. As it turns out, those things coincide perfectly with the things they personally enjoy.

 

Source: Greater Greater Washington

9 things people always say at zoning hearings, illustrated by cats | Austin On Your Feet